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30 Nov 2016 12:30pm

One third of UK workers do not trust their bosses

Only two thirds of UK workers trust the company they work for and feel their contribution at work is valued, a new survey has found

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Caption: Only 65% of employees trust the company they work for, Grant Thornton finds

According to polling from Grant Thornton and the Social Market Foundation (SMF), only 65% of employees said they trust the company they work for, despite 89% believing that trust is important for job satisfaction.

Moreover, a further 89% of those surveyed said that feeling their contribution at work is valued was important for their job satisfaction. Only 66% said this was the case in their workplace.

We need to encourage innovative approaches and a change in corporate culture rather than ‘tick box’ compliance

Sacha Romanovitch, chief executive at Grant Thornton

The survey also found that only 61% of workers feel that their superiors listen to them, despite 86% admitting this was important for their job satisfaction.

Only one third of workers said that their workplace provides opportunities for them to get involved in the running of the business.

Sacha Romanovitch, chief executive at Grant Thornton, said, “Theresa May is right to focus on strengthening trust in business and organisations empowering their people is key to this.

“Business needs to move away from the command and control way of operating and enable their people to have their say and take responsibility in how their business operates."

However, May backtracked on her calls for worker representation on boards last week during the CBI’s annual conference.

The prime minister said, “While it’s important for the voices of workers and consumer to be represented, I can categorically tell you this is not about mandating works councils or direct appointment of workers or trade union representatives on boards."

The polling also found that only half of UK workers agreed that the company they work for treats all of its employees fairly regardless of seniority, while 25% disagreed and 11% strongly disagreed.

Romanovitch said, “The work we have undertaken with the SMF demonstrates there is strong appetite amongst employees to take shared responsibility in their workplace.

“Good governance is in the interest of investors, shareholders, consumers, suppliers and especially employees.

“We need to encourage innovative approaches and a change in corporate culture rather than ‘tick box’ compliance.”

Jessica Fino

 

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