Life
Esther O'Loughlin 13 Apr 2018 09:25am

Six of the best: art exhibitions on right now

From street art in Singapore, to Australian children’s books, to Monet at Tate London, our pick of the most interesting global art exhibitions happening right now

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Caption: You Stop by Tai Snaith is part of the "ReImagine: the world according to children's books" exhibition in Australia

The EY exhibition: Impressionists in London

The Tate Britain – London

Every year, Big Four firm EY sponsors a themed exhibition. This year celebrates impressionist depictions of London by the likes of Monet, Tissot, Pissarro and several others. Many of the pieces stem from the artists’ relocation to the city during the Franco-Prussian war and insurrection in Paris. Despite being the first time that some of them may have seen the UK, their painting style when capturing it has largely influenced the ever-changing British art scene.

Ghada Amer

Cheim & Read – New York

A Cairo-born painter and sculpture, Amer is known for incorporating historical references and social critiques into modern art styles. Much of her work employs this with a focus on the role of women “as subject, versus object”. Her almost-trademark use of thread in paintings emulates the flowing patterns that have become so familiar in her sculptures. This exhibition also largely showcases Amer’s recent foray into ceramics.

Reimagine: the world according to children’s books

Geelong Gallery - Australia

Children’s books can offer a clear reflection of society and the morals or mixed-messages we are exposed to from a young age. Concepts of humanity, family, caring, nature, loneliness, intolerance and cultural difference and belonging are all introduced to children, often before they begin attending school. This collection of writings and illustrations from acclaimed Australian children’s books gives insight into how those messages have changed throughout the last 20 years – as well as those that have not changed at all.

Yayoi Kasuma: All about my love

Matsumoto City Museum of Art – Japan

Known for her outlandish use of colour, abstract methods and strong positive messages, Kasuma has made a name for herself internationally. However, she is taking this exhibition back to her roots. Held in her birthplace, Matsumoto City, this is the largest single-venue exhibition of Kasuma’s work and features 180 pieces, with over half the title series making their world debut. Like all her work, the mediums differ from painting and sculpture to light and digital to interactive as visitors progress through the museum.

LGBTQI+ Banele Khoza

Zietz Museum of Contemporary Art Africa – Cape Town

While the internet promises increased connectivity, it has also become a harvesting ground for superficial relationships. Drawing attention to this, Khoza questions how men are able to love and relate to one another amid confined ideals of masculinity and unreliable notions of love. Fluid acrylic pastels are layered overtop heavier pencil outlines to construct a romantic yet lonely series of naked male portraits encapsulating this struggle.

Art from the streets

ArtScience Museum – Singapore

From cave painting to Banksy, this exhibition tracks the evolution of street art across the globe. It features giant murals, videos and installations from the last 40 years, as well as new pieces from some of the movement’s most iconic names. A spotlight will also be shone on the urban art around Southeast Asia, which despite its low public profile has been taking the movement by storm.